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A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communications

Lisa Silvestri presents 17th annual Huck Boyd Lecture

 Silvestri2017

Lisa Silvestri, author of “Friended at the Front: Social Media in the American War Zone”, was the speaker for the 17th annual Huck Boyd Lecture in Community Media on April 20, 2017. Her lecture — “Remembering our friends from the front” — was in the Kansas State University Alumni Center.

It was sponsored by the Huck Boyd National Center for Community Media, housed in the A.Q. Miller School of Journalism and Mass Communications at K-State, and the K-State Office of Military and Veterans Affairs.

In conjunction with the lecture, Silvestri also participated in a panel discussion coordinated by Lt. Col. (Retired) Art DeGroat, founder and executive director of the Office of Military and Veterans Affairs, and she was a speaker at the annual Kansas Professional Communicators conference on April 21.

Silvestri , author of “Friended at the Front: Social Media in the American War Zone,” is assistant professor of Communication Studies at Gonzaga University. Her research interests focus on American politics and popular culture with a special focus on war and social media. When she is not teaching, writing, and thinking deeply, Silvestri enjoys cooking at home, practicing yoga, listening to music, backpacking or running outside, and drawing inspiration from her favorite poet philosophers: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Wendell Berry, and Dr. Seuss. Her work appears in “Truth in the Public Sphere,” “Popular Communication: The International Journal of Media and Culture,” “Media War & Conflict,” and “Visual Communication Quarterly.” 

 The Huck Boyd center has sponsored 16 previous lectures in community media. The center, founded in 1990, strives to serve and strengthen local newspapers, radio stations, cable systems and other media that play a key role in the survival and revitalization of America's small towns. Huck Boyd believed in preserving the small-town lifestyle and small-town media. Boyd, a Phillipsburg native, published the Phillips County Review, recruited industry to the community and was active in Republican politics, both in Kansas and nationally.

"This lecture is important for the field of community journalism because it highlights the tremendous influence that community media have on the health of their communities," Gloria Freeland, center director, said.